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Partner Communities


Waco, Texas. El Salvador. Haiti. Liberia.

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Partner Communities


Waco, Texas. El Salvador. Haiti. Liberia.

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Development Philosophy


We help people solve their own problems.

Development Philosophy


We help people solve their own problems.

 

Our International Partners provide us with real-world settings in which to reality-test the ideas and techniques we teach our interns. Rather than establish outposts of WHRI in other countries, we seek to empower existing organizations by providing consulting services, trouble-shooting, and in some cases resource generation. In return, our partners host interns during their optional three-month post-Waco internship and help us further develop and refine the development approaches we promote worldwide.

our view of the good news of jesus

Proclamation of the Lordship of Christ and social involvement are inseparable.

  • They are more than parallel goals, rather integral parts of the same message.

  • Social action without the empowerment and guidance of the Holy Spirit is unsustainable and/or self-serving.

  • Economic development without Kingdom values leads to capitalist greed.

  • A call to Christ that doesn’t include a call to service misrepresents Jesus’s fundamental message of Agape love.

  • Good works are not bait to lure people into hearing a message of salvation.

We serve others, empowered by the spirit of Christ, so that they too might be empowered to serve others.


Our Development Approach

Our role is to help people solve their own problems:

  • By teaching a process oflearning, not a set oftechnologies.

  • By connecting communities with resources they would not otherwise have access to.

  • By building the capacity of local organizations and partners rather than establishing our own projects.


Our Global Perspective

Local solutions and global action are both critical elements in bringing justice to the poor.

  • Empowerment of individuals and local communities is the most fundamental way of transforming unjust economic and political structures.

  • Without a supportive national political and economic infrastructure, farmer knowledge and/or innovative technologies will often lead to frustration.

  • Unjust global political and economic structures limit the social and economic well-being of the poor, and must be addressed by Christians working for Kingdom change.

 
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Valle Neuevo, El Salvador


Partnership Established 2009

Valle Neuevo, El Salvador


Partnership Established 2009

 

Valle Nuevo is a rural farming community in mountainous north-central El Salvador. The community is part of a larger municipality known as Santa Marta, in the District of Sensuntepeque. The entire population was displaced throughout most of the 1980’s due to violence of the war between the FMLN and the government of El Salvador. In the late 1980’s the population returned in several groups, one of which now distinguishes itself as Valle Nuevo.

 

The Valle Nuevo community has collaborated with Shalom Mission Communities (SMC) since 1992, when David Jansen participated in an international team observing the disarmament process. With their encouragement, WHRI began working with the community in 2009.

At the request of the Valle Nuevo Directiva, we have focused on income-generating activities that will help support and attract their youth, many of whom have or will be completing university degrees. Initially, this has involved vegetable production and marketing, and over time we hope to help the community produce and process other high-value crops. A Salvadoran NGO, the Asociación Desarrollo Económica y Sociál (ADES), has partnered with us in these and other efforts.

We have been honored to welcome national award-winning documentary photographer, Mark Menjivar, as a partner in this effort as well. On February 18, 2011, Carlos Colón conducted his requiem, Lamentations of  Rufina Amaya, and Mark Menjivar premiered his photographic documentary Retorno, in an event that benefitted World Hunger Relief, Inc. and the community of Valle Nuevo in their work of restoration. Mark’s photo documentary is available to churches and other groups who wish to hold educational or fundraising events. Proceeds will support development efforts in Valle Nuevo.

Carlos Calon, a Salvadorian composer and Waco resident conducted his requiem commissioned by President Carlos Mauricio Funes in honor of all those killed in the civil war in El Salvador. Conducted by the composer at Art Center Waco, at a benefit concert for World Hunger Relief, for their projects at Valle Nuevo, El Salvador.


TRIP REPORTS  |  September 2010  |  February 2011  |  November 2011  |  January 2012  |  August 2012  | January 2013

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World hunger Relief, Haiti


Partnership Established 1980

World hunger Relief, Haiti


Partnership Established 1980

background & Local Context

The Ferrier area lies on the northeastern plain of Haiti, between a mountain range to the south and the Caribbean coast to the north. The region is semi-arid, but receives enough rainfall for excellent production of crops with modest moisture needs such as cassava, sorghum, cowpea, and pigeon pea. Several thousand hectares are also flood irrigated for rice production. In addition to crops, cattle, goat and pig husbandry have been, and continue to be, an important part of the local farm economy.

Several Baptist, Pentecostal, and other protestant denominations are active as well as the Catholic church. Most of these denominations appear to coexist relatively peacefully. World Hunger Relief Haiti tries to work with all these groups without discrimination. The current Board of Directors includes both Protestants and Catholics, and reflects our belief that the Kingdom belongs to all who claim Christ.

 

History & Current Activities

World Hunger Relief, Inc. first began working in northeastern Haiti in 1980. During that decade, a training center was constructed where dozens of interns from Haiti and other countries have trained. In addition, WHRI dug and maintained dozens of wells for drinking water, enabled the establishment of an orphanage now managed by Hope For The Hungry, and managed a large agro-forestry project in cooperation with a UFIMA, a local farmer’s cooperative.

World Hunger Relief—Haiti S.A. was incorporated in Haiti in June, 1990. The organization is entirely Haitian-run, though they do receive financial support and advice from WHRI. They have continued the well drilling ministry, and hold periodic training courses for adults. In 1996 they began construction of a primary school, the College de L’Avenir de Ferrier, which provides practical agricultural training in addition to traditional subjects. In 2008 the school had nearly 300 students in preschool-9th grade. Building construction is an ongoing need and has been supported by WHRI, Mission Waco, and other sources.

In 2008, a participatory community appraisal revealed an interest in renewed agricultural activities. Since this time, WHRI has become increasingly involved in assisting rice producers in the Ferrier area. We are excited about the potential for these activities to provide food and income not just Ferrier, but throughout northern Haiti.

After a visit in February 2009, WHRI staff and interns identified two priorities to address local farmers’ concerns regarding the high cost of inputs for rice production. First, the introduction of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI)a management approach that reduces purchased inputs by optimizing transplantation and water management. This system originated in Madagascar, has spread through much of Asia and parts of Africa, but has never been tried in Haiti. We were fortunate to partner with the Cornell International Institute for Food, Agriculture and Development (CIIFAD) and Jim Carey’s Better U Foundation to organize one of Haiti’s first SRI workshops. WHRI Haiti president, Jackson Nelson, hosted the workshop for over twenty Ferrier farmers.

Ferrier farmers prepare a rice seedling bed using the new System of Rice Intensification (SRI).

Ferrier farmers prepare a rice seedling bed using the new System of Rice Intensification (SRI).

A second priority identified was ox traction to reduce the cost of tillage. Many Ferrier farmers have to pay Dominican farmers to use tractors to plow their fields. This is costly and impacts their ability to plant on time, because the Dominican farmers have to finish plowing their own fields before bringing their equipment across the border. To address the need for ox traction, WHRI and WHR-Haiti have added another Haitian partner: Group of Research and Action for Economic and Social Development (G.R.A.D.E.S.). G.R.A.D.E.S. is made up of Haitian agricultural professionals who, among other skills, have developed a training program for farmers interested in using oxen to work in their fields. They have partnered with WHRI and WHR-Haiti to help local farmers purchase oxen, then provide training to how to use oxen for cultivation. SRI support is provided by the Ag Development Foundation and ox traction support by the Vista Hermosa Foundation.

In addition to these on-going activities, WHRI supports agriculture education in two schools located in Ferrier, the aforementioned College de L’Avenir de Ferrier (CAF) as well as Ecole Technique Agricole de Ferrier (ETAF). We financially support two CAF agriculture teachers, Francois Geffrard and Cleanne Nelson. ETAF, established in 2011, currently trains twenty-five students with a broad academic curriculum as well as practical training in vegetable production, tree nursery management and rice production. ETAF is supported by sales of products from these student-managed enterprises, tuition from students, and modest funding from WHRI.


TRIP REPORTS  |   December 2004  |  October 2005  |  October 2008  |  September 2009  |  February 2010  |  June 2010  |  December 2010  |  April 2011  |  July 2011  |  February 2012  |  September 2012  |  February 2013  |  May 2013  |  July 2013  |  January 2014

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Ricks institute, Liberia


Partnership Established 2012

Ricks institute, Liberia


Partnership Established 2012

 

One of the core values of World Hunger Relief, Inc. is to develop partnerships, which lead us to new opportunities in our path of following God. One of our long-term partnerships with First Baptist Church in Columbus, Georgia led us to new a partnership with Ricks Institute in Liberia.

 

Ricks Institute was founded in 1887 and had developed a reputation as one of the country’s most prominent preparatory schools. Agriculture was a central component of the school with rubber and oil palm plantations on its 1,000-acre grounds. But that was before Liberia’s two civil wars, from 1989 to 1997 and 1999 to 2003. The wars ravaged the school as active fighting took place on the campus, and rebels looted and vandalized the buildings, leaving the classrooms and dorms broken and charred. These rooms then became a refuge and shelter for over 30,000 people.

While the scars of the wars are still visible on some of the school buildings, a new story is forming at Ricks. On the wall in the auditorium foyer there is a quote from Ellen Sirleaf Johnson, Liberia’s current president, which summarized this new story so well:

“We are committed, as a people, to build a new Liberia from the ashes of an old turbulent and tragic past to a future of hope and promise.”

Neil Miller made an initial visit to Ricks Institute in 2012 to explore the potential for this partnership. Since that initial visit, WHRI has had 3 interns participate in our international service learning internship with Ricks as well as Job Carpenter, a biology teacher from Ricks, participate in our 13-month internship in Waco.

Job completed his internship at World Hunger Relief in August of 2013 and returned to Liberia. He accepted the new position of director of Ricks Institute’s Agriculture Program and began incorporating many of the practices he’d learned at World Hunger Relief.

The Agriculture Program at Ricks is now using organic farming practices, abandoning the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, and using soil conservation practices. They also started keeping records, writing down planting dates and harvest yields, tracking livestock births and sale weights.

As the Agriculture Program at Ricks Institute continues to grow, it not only increases the amount of food it provides to the school and its local communities, it also creates opportunities and jobs for people in the local communities. World Hunger Relief will continue to support these new stories of hope and faith through our exchanges and technical advice.

In 2012, World Hunger Relief began working with the agriculture program at Ricks Institute, a school devastated by years of civil war. Dr. Olu Menjay, the principal of Ricks Institute, describes the changes he's seen and the importance of partnerships in accomplishing these changes.

TRIP REPORT  |  November 2015